SlideawayMedia https://slideaway.ca Cambridge, Ontario web design Tue, 13 Mar 2018 03:12:37 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.5 110881082 How To See The Facebook Timeline For Your Brand Page https://slideaway.ca/2017/04/18/how-to-see-the-facebook-timeline-for-your-brand-page/ https://slideaway.ca/2017/04/18/how-to-see-the-facebook-timeline-for-your-brand-page/#respond Tue, 18 Apr 2017 18:34:16 +0000 https://slideaway.ca/?p=1524 A few years ago it used to be rather trivial to see the timeline for your brand page. Facebook used to allow you to essentially use Facebook as your page, so you could like, comment and interact with other posts without much issue. You could see a timeline, just like the one you’d see using…]]>

facebook-brand-page-timelineA few years ago it used to be rather trivial to see the timeline for your brand page. Facebook used to allow you to essentially use Facebook as your page, so you could like, comment and interact with other posts without much issue. You could see a timeline, just like the one you’d see using your personal account. It was pretty great. Then at some point they decided that page managers shouldn’t have nice things like that and that functionality was removed. This was pretty crucial as far as functionality because it allowed you to separate your Facebook business from your personal feed. You could like something on a professional level without the specter of constantly seeing that brand’s content in your personal feed.

How To Bring Back The Old Timeline To Your Brand Page

While it’s unfortunate Facebook decided to regress the experience of managing a page on Facebook, not all is lost. There’s still a URL hack you can use to get the old timeline you knew and loved back. Try adding /pages_feed to your page URL and you’ll be back in business.

https://www.facebook.com/YOURPAGENAME/pages_feed

 

Bonus Tip – How To Like Another Page As Your Page

Since you can now see your timeline again, now how about liking some pages to fill out your newly rediscovered timeline? The easiest way is to go to the brand page you want to like, then look for the … button, beside the share button. That will bring a dropdown out, select Like As Your Page. If you only have a single page you manage, that’s it.

how-to-like-a-page-as-a-page

If you manage multiple pages, a popup will appear prompting you to pick the page you want to like the page as.

select-page-youd-like-tolike-as

 

 

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How To Filter Your Tweets To Facebook Using WordPress, Twools & IFTTT https://slideaway.ca/2016/10/06/how-to-filter-your-tweets-to-facebook-using-wordpress-twools-ifttt/ https://slideaway.ca/2016/10/06/how-to-filter-your-tweets-to-facebook-using-wordpress-twools-ifttt/#respond Thu, 06 Oct 2016 14:30:45 +0000 http://slideaway.ca/?p=1236 How To Filter Your Tweets To Facebook Using WordPress, Twools & IFTTTAwhile back I received a complaint from my sister-in-law about posting Instagram photos to Facebook. Now I have been for years now syndicating my Twitter feed to Facebook, which many people may very well hate. I know personally I derive more value sharing to Facebook and interacting with people than I would if I simply…]]> How To Filter Your Tweets To Facebook Using WordPress, Twools & IFTTT

Awhile back I received a complaint from my sister-in-law about posting Instagram photos to Facebook. Now I have been for years now syndicating my Twitter feed to Facebook, which many people may very well hate. I know personally I derive more value sharing to Facebook and interacting with people than I would if I simply didn’t share to Facebook. If I didn’t share there, I simply wouldn’t be a Facebook user, so this is the compromise I have to strike as an ardent Twitter user.

The Problem

The root of my SILs complaint was that she had to go to Instagram to see my photo anytime I posted, whereas anyone else who posted directly to Facebook from Instagram gets a nice big photo that people can comment on. If I post direct to Facebook from Instagram it would end up showing up twice, once for the Facebook share and a second time for when it gets shared to Twitter, then syndicated to Facebook. There was no way to filter my feed so as to eliminate the Twitter duplicate from being posted to Facebook. While there used to be Facebook apps that allowed you to filter your posts to a point, those have gone by the wayside once Twitter and Facebook offered native integration. There is an app called Selective Tweets on Facebook that allows you to use a #fb hashtag and only import those tagged posts, but now I’m cluttering my posts with extraneous Facebook only data, which is now bringing the problem of platform cruft to Twitter instead of Facebook. I wanted something that was a lot smarter and would allow me to filter things based on my defined rules.

Twitter As RSS

This used to be something rather trivial to sort out, but since Twitter phased out RSS support on their platform awhile back. Bummer. So now we’ve got to figure out how to generate an RSS feed from Twitter. This is where I happened up on a WordPress plugin called Twools. Basically what Twools allows you to do is generate your own custom filtered RSS feed, which is exactly what we’re trying to achieve here. Twools is also available as a standalone app that will work on a PHP enabled server, but I’m going to outline the WordPress method of setting things up.

Requirements:

  • A WordPress self-hosted blog(not a WordPress.com site) or a host that can run PHP
  • A Twitter account

Create A Twitter App

  1. Go to the Twitter Apps site and login with your Twitter account. Create a new app.RSS
  2. Create your app with your own credentials based on the server you’re hosting it on. When naming your app you can’t have Twitter in the name or it will reject the name.
  3. ScreenIn your newly created app go to the API keys, scroll to the bottom of the page and click the create access key button.
  4. In the top right of the page click the Test OAuth button and you will find the keys you need to setup your app credentials in Twools. Keep this tab open.

Setting Up Twools

  1. Download Twools. It isn’t available as a regular plugin through the WordPress admin panel, so you will have to fill out the form on their site and get the download links sent to your email.
  2. Install Twools in WordPress by going to Plugins > Add New > Upload. Upload the zip file you downloaded from the site.
  3. Navigate to Settings>Twools and input the API credentials from that Twitter tab you left open earlier into the corresponding fields in Twools and save your settings.
  4. Click the Launch Twools button and it will leave the WordPress Admin area and go to the full Twools dashboard. Click the feeds button to start setting up your RSS feed.
  5. Under input feed choose user timeline. There are all sorts of other ways of interacting with the Twitter data in here, but for this we’ll just focus on parsing your individual Twitter account.Twools
  6. Under Filters this is where you’ll start individualizing what you’d like to prevent from showing on your Facebook feed. In my case I wanted to block a few different services as well as filter just the links in my feed. I also added the @ symbol so as to remove any tweets that are directed at someone, since the @username syntax just doesn’t make any sense on Facebook. I opted not to filter hashtags, since they actually do have their place on Facebook these days. There are lots of ways of you can filter things here, so get creative. Once you’re done hit the Generate Feed button.Twools
  7. You should now see your newly generated and filtered RSS feed of your tweets. If they aren’t filtering properly, hit the back button and play with the filter settings until you get the desired result. Copy this RSS feed for our next steps.

Posting To Facebook From IFTTT

IFTTT

      1. Go the ifttt.com and signup or login if you already have an account.
      2. Click Create to start a new recipe. Click the this link and choose RSS from the options.
      3. Under Choose A Trigger select New Feed Item. Then under Complete Field Trigger paste the RSS feed that you generated earlier.
      4. Click the That link and select Facebook from the options. If you haven’t setup Facebook before in IFTTT it’ll prompt you to grant it access.
      5. Choose Create A Link Post. This will make it so your link from Twitter will parse nicely on Facebook with the previewed URLs you always see on the site.
      6. Under Link URL, click the plus sign and select EntryUrl from the Ingredient list. Do the same for the message box, but choose EntryTitle.
      7. Click Create Action, then Create Recipe and your new Recipe will be active. Click the Check Recipe Now button and it should run the recipe for the first time and send your latest post to Facebook.Posting

Once I got this setup working I realized I had a need for a second recipe to be created, one for when I posted something that wasn’t a link and had no @ symbols, so I created a second RSS feed for those instances and created a second recipe in IFTTT. That recipe was different in that instead of using Create Link Post I used Create A Status Message. If I didn’t make this second feed I found that Facebook would always want to create a post with a link, which would point back to my original Tweet on Twitter which wasn’t ideal, so that solved it.One thing I thought I should mention is that since you’re running your tweets through essentially 2 different services before posting to Facebook there is a delay in when your tweet will be posted. In my experience so far it can be as little as a couple of minutes to up to about half an hour, which to me isn’t a big deal.While it may not be the most straightforward way of achieving the goal I have found that it is by far the best way of controlling the flow of data from Twitter to Facebook. I find I’m shocked that nobody has built a Facebook app that brings more robust filtering of Twitter, but until that happens with is the next best thing.

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Optimize Your LinkedIn Profile To Bring In Sales Leads https://slideaway.ca/2016/10/05/optimize-your-linkedin-profile-to-bring-in-sales-leads/ https://slideaway.ca/2016/10/05/optimize-your-linkedin-profile-to-bring-in-sales-leads/#respond Thu, 06 Oct 2016 01:31:29 +0000 http://slideaway.ca/?p=1229 Optimize Your LinkedIn Profile To Bring In Sales LeadsOf all the social networks online today LinkedIn stands out as the top destination for professional interactions. Having the reputation as the go-to site for those looking for jobs, it’s actually much more than that. LinkedIn has morphed into a powerful platform to connect professionals. Getting your profile whipped into shape and ready to capitalize…]]> Optimize Your LinkedIn Profile To Bring In Sales Leads
Of all the social networks online today LinkedIn stands out as the top destination for professional interactions. Having the reputation as the go-to site for those looking for jobs, it’s actually much more than that. LinkedIn has morphed into a powerful platform to connect professionals. Getting your profile whipped into shape and ready to capitalize on potential leads this social media platform can generate for you.

 

  1. Maximize Your Profile

    The first and foremost thing you can do with your LinkedIn profile is fill it out to the max. While this may take some time, it’s definitely worth the effort. Include a professional quality headshot with your profile. Even if you don’t a professional headshot don’t use a low quality photo. In this day and age where everyone has a high definition camera on their smartphone there is no excuse why you can’t get someone to snap something decent for you. Choose a professional headline that uses keywords people would be using to find your profile. This is important because you want your profile to be found within LinkedIn via search, and externally by search engines. The more data you include about your experience the more likely you will show up in search results. Even if you’ve optimized your profile previously it’s good practice to check in every few months to see if your profile is up to date. LinkedIn has added lots of additional fields and ways to highlight your work experience including the ability to add documents, photos, links, videos and more to your profile.

  2. Give To Get Recommendations

    One of the most powerful things you can add to your profile is a recommendation from colleagues who have worked with you. The best way to actually get a recommendation is by being willing to give them. Recommendations do take some amount of time and effort to write, so the best way to spur someone to write one for you is to write them for other people. LinkedIn solicits skills and endorsements from your contacts about you all the time, but getting a personal recommendation for your work is far more valuable.

  3. Maximize Who You’re Connected With

    LinkedIn has quite a few methods to connect with people you already know. Connecting your email address book is the best tactic for shaking out all the people who you know on the platform. You can also upload a csv or txt file with your mailing list. It will then match up those email addresses with who is using LinkedIn. You never know where your next lead could come from. Maybe you played soccer with a guy 5 years ago who’s in the market to sell. Maybe you’re connecting with him right at a pivotal point in his process and get a lead by being right place, right time per say. Expanding your network on LinkedIn is crucial to generating leads. Comb through the People You May Know feature often. Since it’s a social network LinkedIn starts trying to figure out who you might know through shared connections. If you share multiple connections with a certain person there’s a decent possibility you may know that connection.

  4. Share Great Content And Be Active To Keep Top Of Mind

    When you make a connection with someone on LinkedIn odds are this person isn’t going to be in the market for your services right then and there. Updates are a great way to keep yourself on someone else’s radar. When sharing great content it’s always a good idea to offer your own insights on the share to provide context. When you share content, like an article or update your profile these changes will often be visible to your contacts in the news feed. Actively engaging on the platform keeps your name and title in at the top of their minds, even if they don’t realize it. Social media mentions have been shown to trigger purchasing decisions, so getting your name into someone’s short term memory could really pay dividends when they’re ready to make a purchasing decision.

  5. Direct Mail Campaigns With Sponsored InMail

    LinkedIn allows you to create direct marketing campaigns with Sponsored InMail. Allowing you to target prospective leads using geography is a great way to find your next customers. LinkedIn can target users in a specific zip/postal code and make sure your message is delivered to active LinkedIn users in a particular neighbourhood you want to market your services. LinkedIn claims a 100% delivery rate for sponsored InMail. If a message isn’t read, you don’t pay for it, which is pretty handy. Catering your messaging to particular local audience can really yield results.

  6. Curate Your Online Professional Image

    Using LinkedIn is a great component as part of a larger strategy to manage your online brand. LinkedIn profiles rank quite well in search engines and will often show up on the first page of results. When curating your online image it’s important to make sure when people search for you and your business that they’re finding the right kinds of information. Your company web page and social media profiles all help you control the messaging, branding and information that can be found online about you. I know professionally when coming across a new contact I will always Google someone to find out a little more about them if I’ve never met them before. Having a fully fleshed out LinkedIn profile can really help someone who may not be familiar with you get a sense of what you’re all about and give a great first impression.

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Unifying Your Social Media Handles https://slideaway.ca/2016/10/05/unifying-your-social-media-handles/ https://slideaway.ca/2016/10/05/unifying-your-social-media-handles/#respond Thu, 06 Oct 2016 01:05:16 +0000 http://slideaway.ca/?p=1223 Unifying Your Social Media HandlesLike most companies these days your social media strategy probably involves multiple platforms, be it Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and beyond. The question I ask is, do these social accounts share a common username? Or are they a mishmash of whatever was available? Maybe you got your preferred username on Twitter, but couldn’t do the same…]]> Unifying Your Social Media Handles

Like most companies these days your social media strategy probably involves multiple platforms, be it Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and beyond. The question I ask is, do these social accounts share a common username? Or are they a mishmash of whatever was available? Maybe you got your preferred username on Twitter, but couldn’t do the same on Instagram as that username was already taken. While ideally you’d like to be able to snag the username of choice on every platform you use, sometimes that’s not viable for companies that might have competition for their username.

Cross Platform Compatibility

One thing I’m a big advocate of is cross pollinating multiple social channels. If you can share the same message from one to the next that’s a great way of optimizing your social efforts. Where the problem pops up is what if other users want to take your content and share it on another social platform? If someone uses a service like IFTTT(If This Then That), will they be able to connect with you on different platforms? One strategy I like using is to post an Instagram photo, then use IFTTT to post a native photo to Twitter. If I @ mention another user on Instagram, will they actually have the same username on Twitter? If they don’t, then the tweet will show a broken @username in the tweet and nobody gets notified of the interaction. Ideally you want to make it easy for users to interact with your business without creating friction.

DIfferent Username Syntax On Different Platforms

An issue you might run into is each different social platform has slightly different allowable usernames. On Twitter only alphanumeric characters and underscores are allowed. On Instagram there’s an added wrinkle that on top of alphanumeric and underscores, you can use periods. Then Facebook allows dashes instead of underscores. Really the only way to make sure you have a username that is compatible on all platforms is to stick to alphanumeric characters. You may end up with something longer, but at very least it will be unique to your business.

You Can Change Usernames

While this is a step that can be fraught with peril, it may be worth doing for your business. Changing your username can cause the issue of missed interactions with people. But on the plus side you won’t be losing any followers by making the change, everything about your account stays the same online, just the username changes. On Twitter and Instagram making the change is pretty trivial. On Facebook it’s more of a one and done thing, as you’re not allowed to make more than one username change. So if you take this step, make sure to get it right the first time around.

Update Your Messaging

After you make the change be sure to tell your followers. Be transparent that you made the change and keep them up to date. You definitely want them on board and know what’s going on. Then comes the painful part. If you’ve invested in signage in your store or business cards with your social accounts you’ll probably have to get them updated.

Benefits

While updating your social usernames may be a pain, it does come with some added benefits. You’ll be easier to find online. If a customer knows your username on one platform they will be able to find you on the next they wish to connect with you on. Finding something unique to your business also helps you reinforce your branding. Being able to concisely point someone to your social media accounts with a single username versus telling them 2 or 3 different usernames will just help ease confusion and remove friction from connecting with your brand online.

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Social Media Use Case For Restaurants https://slideaway.ca/2011/06/26/social-media-use-case-for-restaurants/ https://slideaway.ca/2011/06/26/social-media-use-case-for-restaurants/#comments Sun, 26 Jun 2011 17:55:02 +0000 http://www.slideaway.ca/?p=431 Social media use case for restaurantsAs I’m sure many of you are aware I’m an avid social media user, in particular Twitter under the handle @modsuperstar and to a lesser extent through my account for this site, @slideawaymedia. On Friday I witnessed something online that quite amazed me and really brought into focus how powerful social media can be in…]]> Social media use case for restaurants

As I’m sure many of you are aware I’m an avid social media user, in particular Twitter under the handle @modsuperstar and to a lesser extent through my account for this site, @slideawaymedia. On Friday I witnessed something online that quite amazed me and really brought into focus how powerful social media can be in promoting your business. In this case it was a new restaurant in Guelph called Smokin’ Tony’s BBQ.

As Twitter seemingly has no great way of following a multiple person conversation I’m going to do my best to present this in some type of orderly fashion.

As you can see this conversation starts out on a topic entirely unrelated to the restaurant, about eating bacon. There are casual jokes back and forth and the topic eventually shifts to a new local restaurant, Smokin’ Tony’s. Dawn (@saffyre9) has been to this restaurant and begins evangelizing the experience to others who were unaware of the place.  You’ll notice Dawn uses the hashtag #smokintonys to begin categorizing the topic and make it easier for others to discover Smokin’ Tony’s, as they currently don’t have a Twitter account to reference.

Next thing you know a whole group of local women begin organizing a get together that involved visiting Smokin’ Tony’s in the near future, all interested by this social media endorsement offered by Dawn.

As someone who follows all the people taking part in this conversation, this definitely piqued my interest.  I’ve been known to enjoy a good BBQ restaurant and have traveled to Hog Tails BBQ in Waterloo a few times, as well as going to Camp 31 in my hometown of Paris quite a few times over the years.  Discovering a new BBQ place just down the road in Guelph sounds like a pretty good idea for dinner.  I convinced my wife and we were off to Guelph to give it a go.

I proceeded to check in using location based social network Foursquare and announce to Twitter that I was having dinner at this new place and subsequently was asked about my experience by one of my local followers.

My previous check-in was noted by Dawn and she mentioned the people who had been taking part in the conversation earlier.  This began a whole new conversation about the restaurant and our experiences there.

My wife Corina (@quirkycori) tweeted about her experience, giving a glowing review, then telling an interested follower where to check this place out.

We’ll move forward in the story to Saturday and it comes to light that someone I had recently started following, Bang Ly (@superbang) was actually sitting at the table next to my wife and I at the same time we were there.  When he walked by I actually recognized him by his avatar, but just thought it was coincidence at the time.  Even more amusingly, he happened to take a picture and there are my wife and I in the background. Now I’m not sure if Bang also got the dinner idea from Dawn’s conversation, but it really is amazing how many local Twitter folk ended up checking out Smokin’ Tony’s on Friday night.

Looking at all these conversations I am pretty amazed thinking of the possibilities.  The genesis of this idea was as simple as one person mentioning a restaurant for the idea to spread. In the excerpts I posted there were 10 different people involved in these various exchanges and I really have no way of guesstimating how large of scope this conversation might have been exposed to through various people’s follower networks.  Sure not everyone in my, or other people’s Twitter network is local, but I bet you could easily have exposed a couple hundred potential customers to Smokin’ Tony’s in the span of a couple hours.  And this is just the stuff I can track and see within my network of followers.  How many other conversations might have been spawned from this one conversation?

How many dollars were generated just by this online conversation? Sure it might have started out as an innocuous Twitter back and forth, but more than likely it has, and will result in hundreds of dollars being spent at this restaurant.  Multiple people took action, hopped into their cars and opened their wallets to a new business, merely at the mention of it online.  Word of mouth is still one of the most powerful promotion methods a business can employ, but rarely will you ever be able to trace word of mouth like you can on Twitter.

Update 06/27 10:30am: All this positive commentary was happening online and it was probably entirely unbeknownst to the owners of Smokin’ Tony’s. I just sent an email to them through their website about this article and hope to hear back from them. If they do I will post an update.  The thing that gets me wondering is how often is this happening? How often are businesses generating new customers through social media without even having a presence of their own?  Imagine what happens when the business is on Twitter and can help guide the conversation.

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Tweetstock 2 in Brantford https://slideaway.ca/2010/09/24/tweetstock-2-in-brantford/ https://slideaway.ca/2010/09/24/tweetstock-2-in-brantford/#respond Fri, 24 Sep 2010 13:52:21 +0000 http://www.slideaway.ca/?p=409 twitter-isnt-about-what-you-had-for-lunchI attended the second edition of Brantford’s Tweetstock, a social media targeted event that featured much of Brantford’s social networking community. I was very curious to check out this event as someone who grew up in Paris and spent a large amount of time in Brantford up until 3 years ago when I moved to Cambridge.

I’ve been to tonnes of different social events around KW, Cambridge and Guelph so I wanted to see what Brantford was up to in social media circles. The event was held at Al Dente on King George Road, a place I hadn’t been to in probably 15 years. I was definitely impressed, as it was held on the covered patio outside. Luckily we had a perfect Fall night and didn’t get too cold. The unique location gave the event a vibe all its own.

The event was very well organized, with a slick accompanying website and printed materials. They had multiple sponsors and gave away door and raffle prizes, which I was lucky enough to win one. Kudos to @octopusred, @Trevor_Cherewka and @josefstevens for putting on a heck of a gathering.

Adam King ( @sabbatical ) presenting at Tweetstock 2Speakers for the night included @sabbatical, @kevinamagee, @sydbolton, @davecarrol, @brantfordcomedy and @digitalduckinc. The speakers of the night did presentations talking about topics like Twitter, Facebook, Gmail and other social networks. The tone was rather introductory, as Brantford seems to have a rather fledgling community when it comes to social engagement compared to other events I’ve been to. All the speakers put on great presentations and really worked to engage the audience.

I had a great time at the event, meeting a bunch of people I had followed on Twitter previously, along with a lot of new people. I was very pleased to see Brantford mobilizing and engaging their social community. Communities need to be nurtured and it was great to see Brantford planting the seeds to a vibrant online social network.

Other Blogs about Tweetstock 2

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New SlideawayMedia office https://slideaway.ca/2010/03/19/new-slideawaymedia-office/ https://slideaway.ca/2010/03/19/new-slideawaymedia-office/#comments Fri, 19 Mar 2010 18:42:28 +0000 http://www.slideaway.ca/?p=233 Recently if you follow my Twitter feed you might have heard me mention I was painting my office. Well after a week of work I’ve finally got things back in order. Previously the office was painted builder grade white, having never been touched since the house was built. I figured since I spent so much time in here I wanted to liven things up a little at SlideawayMedia HQ.

I shot a video of my office, just to show off the new setup.

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What does your email address say about you? https://slideaway.ca/2010/03/04/what-does-your-email-address-say-about-you/ https://slideaway.ca/2010/03/04/what-does-your-email-address-say-about-you/#comments Thu, 04 Mar 2010 19:51:16 +0000 http://www.slideaway.ca/?p=174 What does your email address say about you?Something that I’ve seen quite frequently lately is people using the wrong type of email addresses when promoting their businesses. You don’t want people drawing conclusions on your professionalism and business acumen just because of your choice of email address. You’ve worked hard to build your business reputation, so here are some pitfalls you’ll want…]]> What does your email address say about you?

Something that I’ve seen quite frequently lately is people using the wrong type of email addresses when promoting their businesses. You don’t want people drawing conclusions on your professionalism and business acumen just because of your choice of email address. You’ve worked hard to build your business reputation, so here are some pitfalls you’ll want to avoid.

Avoid ISP email addresses
Whether it be an @rogers.com, @sympatico.ca or some other smaller internet service provider, this just sends the wrong kind of message to prospective clients. Email addresses like this work as beacon to the rest of the world telling them you probably aren’t very well versed with the online world. If your address is from an ISP people could draw the conclusion that you’re just a part timer or that you may only access your email when they get home at the end of the day.

The biggest issue I find with these emails is what if you decide to change ISPs? Sometimes these changes are inevitable, be it for poor service or maybe you find a better deal with another provider and want to make the leap. Swapping hosts also means abandoning your email address. To make this change you need to tell everyone in your address book to update their contact info for you. This can be a huge task, as you can’t always count on people taking action. I have an old email address that I abandoned 5 years ago and still have a few stragglers that send the odd email to me there. If you’re using your ISP email address for business communication, you could even suffer from the added hassle of having to reprint business cards and other professional materials to reflect this change. Ideally you don’t want to be losing business leads because you decided to save a few bucks on your internet bill.

Avoid free online email accounts
Odds are pretty much everyone on the planet has a free email address from either Hotmail, Yahoo or Gmail. I signed up for my first Hotmail account way back in 1996, before Microsoft bought them. These addresses are quite handy, but don’t give off the greatest signals when used for business purposes. As soon as I see a free email service used as someone’s point of contact, how I view them as a professional goes down a notch or two. Even worse is if the actual account is something silly like billybob3892@yahoo.com, it just shows you have little regard for how you present yourself online. If you have to go with a free provider for your email, the best bet these days for salvaging a shred of professionalism is Gmail.

I find the worst lapses in judgment for people is when they actually own their own web domain, yet haven’t made the effort to get email address aliases created and instead use a Hotmail.com email address. It’s like they’ve already run a marathon, then forgot to cross finish line.

Buy yourself a domain name
The cost of registering a domain for a year can be less then what you paid for yesterday’s lunch. Prices can typically range from $6 to $12 dollars, depending on what type of domain you’re registering. So really the barrier of entry is pretty low. If you don’t intend on creating a website right away, many registrars offer the ability to host email for you for a monthly fee. While this typically isn’t cost effective when compared to a hosting package, $3 a month for your own personal, professional email address is money well spent. If you are looking to create a website along with email addresses, I’m sure SlideawayMedia could help you out. If you’re looking for a good Canadian registrar, I use NamesPro.ca and host my sites with Canadian Web Hosting.

Services like Gmail actually allow you to combine multiple email addresses into one inbox as well. Here’s a tutorial on how to combine multiple accounts into Gmail I wrote awhile back. This is handy on so many levels as it keeps all your mail in one spot and allows you to seamlessly use emails from your web domain, while still having the handiness of using Gmail to access your mail from virtually anywhere.

Projecting a professional image online requires the total package, including the use of professional email addresses. If you’ve worked really hard at crafting your image and reputation, don’t sabotage that by using a bad email address.

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Don’t cancel the Drayton Theatre project https://slideaway.ca/2010/02/02/dont-cancel-the-drayton-theatre-project/ https://slideaway.ca/2010/02/02/dont-cancel-the-drayton-theatre-project/#respond Wed, 03 Feb 2010 00:53:13 +0000 http://www.slideaway.ca/?p=158 I wrote a rebuttal to a commentary in the local Cambridge Times mentioning the idea of canceling the Drayton Theatre project in Cambridge. Who knows if it’ll get published?

I wanted to comment on the idea that canceling the Drayton Theatre project would be a boon for Cambridge taxpayers.  I think making a move like this would be quite shortsighted and hurt our community in the long run.  Cambridge is in need of a facelift, badly.  In a recent Conference Board of Canada report we were given a “D” grade, which lumped us among Brantford, Windsor and Oshawa when it comes to attracting new people into our community.  That is not the type of company we want to be keeping when compared to other cities.

Cambridge needs to progress and evolve our community away from its manufacturing roots and begin to attract new, sharp, forward thinking minds to the area.  We need to work be towards a knowledge and information based economy in our region.  This can be achieved by giving people a reason to move here, investing in innovation and the arts instead of shuttering projects like the Drayton Theatre.  Stimulating the arts helps make our city a more vibrant and desirable destination for newcomers.

I think people of this community will forever feel second fiddle to cities like Kitchener, Waterloo and Guelph because we’re doing so little to attract new thinking and ideas to our area.  I’m a local web designer and frequently go to get togethers and meetups in Waterloo to interact with like minded people looking to enrich their skills and make new contacts.  I know of many other people from Cambridge making that same trek into Waterloo, since there isn’t any similar type of community available here.

We need to encourage the arts, not crush them in the name of shortsightedness.

Writing a letter to the editor definitely makes me feel like an old man. It’s the first time I’ve ever done it, so hopefully it gets into the paper.

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Why no WiFi at Cambridge City Hall? https://slideaway.ca/2010/01/29/why-no-wifi-at-cambridge-city-hall/ https://slideaway.ca/2010/01/29/why-no-wifi-at-cambridge-city-hall/#comments Fri, 29 Jan 2010 17:59:34 +0000 http://www.slideaway.ca/?p=151 Cambridge City Hall and TechnologyI sent this email to the City of Cambridge today voicing my disappointment with the lack of WiFi available at our City Hall. Ironically when I pressed send I got a hasty response telling me that the address questions@city.cambridge.on.ca had failed, so it seems like they launched their City Hall website and didn’t check whether the address on the contact page was actually functioning. So instead I emailed it to the Mayor, Council and Community Services.

Hello,
I was curious as to why there is no free wifi available at City Hall?  I went there today to the Small Business Centre and found it to be closed for another hour because of a meeting.  I tried to access the internet through my phone, but found that the big stone walls of city hall allowed for little to no connectivity through my Rogers iPhone.  I know myself as a small business owner I would appreciate that I would be able to send and receive emails while conducting my business at City Hall.

For a public space claiming to that “the future is high tech“, I would anticipate something that every coffee cafe in Cambridge can offer would be able to manage what has essentially become a common courtesy to offer patrons.

Is there currently a plan to implement wifi in Cambridge City Hall, and if so when?

In building a beautiful new facility like the one Cambridge has I would figure it would be the goal to want to bring people to use and spend time within the facility.  Guelph is in the process of offering free wifi at their new city hall.  Burlington already does.  Cambridge needs to cater to their local technology community as the city looks to transition away from being a manufacturing based economy.  Offering simple things like wifi in public places helps keep smart, technologically engaged people living in the area instead of losing them to more progressive municipalities.

Thanks for your time,

jamEs harris

I’ll update this post if and when I get a response.

Update from February 2nd, 2010

Dear James,
Mayor Craig asked me to follow up with you regarding your note.  We appreciate your feedback.  As you can image, there are a number of services we provide through the Small Business Centre and most recently we upgraded the internet connections and provide a separate line, outside the city network firewalls so that entrepreneurs can access sites that are traditionally blocked by our network.  I was advised by the centre that there was a sign on the door which would have directed you to the second floor to Economic Development division as there is only one staff member who works at the centre.  Should you have needed the resources of the centre, it would have been opened for you where possible.

City Hall is a Wifi hot spot for Atria, however, access is not free and you would require a stick to utilize the service. There are no plans to provide this service free of charge at this point because of budget impacts but I have passed along your suggestion to our technology services team.  In terms of sending emails and using Roger’s service, I am not sure what might have happened for your system to fail.  The City uses mobile devices from City Hall without issue and in fact, service throughout Civic Square has been tested on several occasions.

Thanks for pointing out the old questions email.  The front page of our website and other areas within the site have been updated, however, the section you reference is a separate website and I will be sure to connect with the team that manages this content – it’s an older site but still part of our online materials to give the history of the project.  I really appreciate you taking the time to point this out.

I hope I have answered your questions and would be happy to reconnect should you require anything further.

Regards,

Lin

As far as I’m concerned an Atria pay solution simply does not cut it. I understand that there is cost involved, but setting up a wireless router on the main floor of the building doesn’t seem like rocket science. Even restricted network service that blocks content is better then nothing at all.

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